Government regulations

  
 
Any business that stores customer payment information must comply with a number of state and federal regulations. The legal, healthcare, and financial sectors have a number of laws tailored specifically for them (such as HIPAA or CISPA). If you run almost any kind of professional practice or agency you probably have very specific data security requirements. Running afoul of these regulations puts you at risk for legal action and probably means that you have bad security in place.
 
As a professional, your focus needs to be on your clients and running your firm. Regulatory requirements to ensure data security can be complex and include rigorous testing requirements. Ensuring compliance with the regulations can be a serious distraction for you and take you into territory where your experience is limited.
 
One of the best solutions is to work with a third party who has strong credentials in the area of regulatory compliance and data security. When you are working with a third party to set up security or data storage, make sure that they have experience working in your industry. Finding a service provider with experience in your profession can give you peace of mind knowing that you can focus on running your business without the distraction of ongoing technology concerns.
Government regulations

Cybersecurity 101: You are the problem – Seriously simple steps you already know, but you don’t do

 

Look, we’ve all been there.  Complaining about all the security policy rules and how they waste your time.  Frustrated at all the passwords we have to remember.  And just when we do, ‘they’ force us to change them.  Demanding that we make them more complicated. Stronger.  Longer. Random..er.  It’s like, why even bother with new technology?  The technology that is supposed to make us more productive is making us LESS productive.  I’m sorry, but I have some news for you.  You are the problem…or at least part of the problem.  I know that sounds like bad news, but really it’s good news.  Because you can fix you.  Psychologist Henry Cloud says, “You can’t fix a problem that’s not in the room.”  So once we are all ready to admit that we are the problem, now we can start building a solution, practicing new disciplines and forming new habits.

Here are just a few security habits that you need to stop or start doing.

  1. Your password is not secure.  I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had clients give me the puppy dog eyes regarding how simple their password is.  They know it.  I know it.  We all know it. But for those that don’t, here it goes.  Sorry, your company name with a few random numbers is not secure.  No, your favorite season and the current year is no better.   While we are at it, STOP using a word from the alphabet unless you are going to use a passphrase.  What’s a passphrase?  A passphrase is a way to make you password longer while avoiding a string of random letters, characters and numbers that are impossible to memorize.  Length of passwords matter.  Hacker @TinkerSec tweeted the other day that “8 character passwords are dead.”  They said, “…we can go through the entire keyspace (upper,lower,number,symbol 95^8) of all 8 character passwords in ~5 hours (hashtype NTLM).”  That means that no matter what your password is, if it’s 8 characters, you can be hacked in 5 hours or less.  So the new norm is going to have to be longer.  I’m seeing companies starting to enforce 15 character passwords.  How is someone supposed to remember a highly complicated 15 character password?  START using Passphrases.  The fact is that the passphrase “My father wears sneakers in the pool 1” is more secure than the password “a#IKlfpao76ee” let alone “Snowball2017”.  It’s also easier to remember.  One catch is that not all systems allow this, so it is not a silver bullet.  Which means at the end of the day, it may be unavoidable for you to START using a password manager. A password manager is an app that will securely store your passwords so you can STOP using post it notes.  LastPass is a good one that I use.  There is a free version for consumers, so now you are without excuse.  All of your super complex passwords and passphrases locked tight and at your fingertips.  When I introduced LastPass to my wife, it changed her life.  In fact, she said, “Using a password manager like LastPass has removed my anxiety of passwords.  I can generate a complex password and easily copy and paste when I need to use them.”
  2. Why just one when you can do two?  I won’t spend a lot of time on this one because it is a similar concept to the first one.  STOP using only a password, and START using multiple forms of authication.  It’s called multi-factor authentication, which basically means that you need two or more separate ways to authenticate your yourself.  The concept is simple.  You will be more secure if authentication requires 2 of the following 3 items: Something you know, something you have or something you are.  Your password is something you know, and hackers have gotten quite good and compromising that.  Something you have would be like a key card, or a phone running the google authenticator app.  Something you are involves biometrics like a fingerprint scanner or something.  Using MFA is getting easier and easier to do, and it will provide much more security.
  3. You have voices in your head, use them.  My mom used to say that, “If it makes your nose wrinkle, pay attention.”   As I have stated, you know what is secure.  You know when an email looks ‘phishy’.  There is a voice deep inside all of us that understands many of these concepts,  but disciplining ourselves to listen to it and take action (or forego taking action) can be challenging.  If something doesn’t seem right, ask someone.  STOP trusting everything.  I have heard it said that you should ‘trust, but verify’.  If you get an email that looks out of the ordinary from someone, take a couple minutes to call and check.  Let them know that it looked suspicious.  For example, “Hi Bob, I got an email from you that only contained a link to a website and nothing else.  It looked suspicious, and I was going to delete it but wanted to check with you first.”  Even if it is a legit email, you are still helping the situation by letting that person know that something they did caused suspicion which might cause them to change behavior and write a little personal note with the link the next time they forward you the latest cat video.  START listening to the voices in your head.  The voices are often smarter than you think.

These tips will help get you started on the journey ahead.  So that hopefully you can STOP adding to the problem, and START becoming part of the solution.

Cybersecurity 101: You are the problem – Seriously simple steps you already know, but you don’t do

Higher goals get dragged down by Tech: The NPO story

 
 
If you are a smaller Not-for-Profit, it is likely that your organization has been driven from its inception by individuals strongly motivated with a passion for their cause or humanitarian goal. As a result, it is also possible that the leadership has little interest in developing the administrative technology infrastructure that is necessary for any organization to function in the internet age.
 
Failure to understand and focus on technology can damage an organization’s growth and success. However, NPO leadership has to be laser focused on the day-to-day struggles of the organization such as seeking funding, keeping the doors open, and pursuing the mission. As a consequence, technology infrastructure may be cobbled together as an afterthought; resource limitations may lead to short term tech decisions that can be wasteful and more expensive in the long term.
 
An NPO, with its tight budget margins, is an excellent example of an organization that could benefit from outsourcing its fundamental tech needs to a MSP. A MSP can determine short and long term needs, assess possible solutions, and propose the most cost effective tech solutions to ensure a stable, long-term tech infrastructure. Without the time or stomach for administrative distractions, NPOs may continue to use the break/fix model, making less informed tech decisions that may ultimately waste precious resources. Good and careful planning with a professional can mean a better strategic use of organizational resources far into the future.
Higher goals get dragged down by Tech: The NPO story

Password basics people still ignore

 
 
You can have all the locks on your data center and have all the network security available, but nothing will keep your data safe if your employees are careless with passwords.
  
  1. Change Passwords – Most security experts recommend that companies change out all passwords every 30 to 90 days.
  2. Require passwords that mix upper and lowercase, number, and a symbol.
  3. Teach employees NOT to use standard dictionary words ( in any language), or personal data that can be known, or can be stolen: addresses, telephone numbers, SSNs, etc.
  4. Emphasize that employees should not access anything using another employee’s login. To save time or for convenience, employees may leave systems and screens open and let others access them. This is usually done so one person doesn’t have to take the time to logout and the next take the effort to log back in. Make a policy regarding this and enforce it. If you see this happening, make sure they are aware of it.
These are just a few basic password hints, but they can make a difference.

Password basics people still ignore

Business Trade Shows Part III: After the Event

So, you made it back home from the show. You’re exhausted and work has backed up in your absence. Here is where the entire investment in the show can go down the drain. Follow-up is critical. Every one of those prospects need to have follow-up. Lots of it. One contact isn’t going to be enough.

First, send out a short email drip that includes a ‘thanks for visiting us at the trade show.’ The second should be a ‘call to action’ email. Send an invitation to meet via phone or in person, and add something for them to download. The download can be a whitepaper, or even just your brochure, but it is always good to attach something.

Now comes the really hard work. Contacting prospects. No one is going to just mail you revenues. You need to actively market to your trade show visitors. If some seem uninterested, put their names in a tickler file to try back in 6 months. Just be sure not to just let them drop; the situation may change in the future.

In summary, look at a trade show as a marketing event that goes beyond the time spent at a booth in some convention center. It is just a stage in a lengthy and important marketing campaign. Make sure you prepare for the show and do active follow-up afterward. Otherwise a trade show is just an expensive few days meeting lots of people you will never see again.

Business Trade Shows Part III: After the Event